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with us. here's a look at what is coming up today -- italy. a trip to a prison island. russia -- the desperate life of many orphans. france -- how architects want to improve life in the suburbs. first, to turkey and its relationship with religious minorities. some are officially recognized in turkey. jews, a greek orthodox, and armenian christians. the turkish government has made concessions to christian minorities, such as returning property confiscated a long time ago. churches, for example. that has given armenians in turkey in fresh confidence boost, but their situation remains difficult. ankara still refuses to recognize the genocide of armenians under ottoman rule 100 years ago. officially, there are some 60,000 armenians in turkey, but the numbers could be rising. in some parts of turkey, descendants of armenians are now rediscovering their identity. >> home to a population of more than 1 million, the city is situated on the turkey -- turkish/i iraqi border. it is the unofficial capital of turkey. but it was not always. between the many minuets that make up the skyline
the story may face prison. and as russia remembers the battle of stalingrad, what does it say about the country's tanzania." mlk >> president francois hollande says french troops will only withdraw from mali when african forces can replace them. hollande visited timbuktu on saturday. egypt's interior ministry has condemned the beating of a protestor in cairo. one person was killed during violent demonstrations on friday outside the presidential palace. syrian government tanks have been blown up by roadside bombs in the capital, damascus. there have been violent clashes between government and rebel forces in karnak. in india, the man accused of a gang rape of a fizz therapist student entered a nonguilty plea. the court case in new delhi has been fast tracked. the victim was beaten, raped and thrown from a bus. she died two weeks later. on friday, india's cabinet approved harsher punishments for rapists. including the death penalty. members of paramilitary force have been arrested on suspicion of molesting a group of girls on a train. a somali woman who accused government soldiers of
libya and syria. it even has the support of russia. >> france's president francois hollande is hoping to drum up some business deals and avoid more tensions over a prominent french exile who has been making himself at home in russia. >> cordial talks, but the russian and french leaders could not be described as close friends. francois hollande came to moscow with seriously most guessing issue. he wants vladimir putin to rethink his support for the assad regime -- the most pressing issue being syria. he wants vladimir putin to rethink his support for the assad regime. it is a different frenchman whose company vladimir putin refers -- prefers, gerard depar diueu, who made another visit to russia earlier this week. he is treated as a hero wherever he goes. his presence has dominated french-russian relations of late. >> the french president has to ignore that and focus on his work. his main challenge is to expand trade relations between france and russia. france, right all eu countries, is in a crisis and needs new markets. >> is another of hollande -- that is another of hollande's priori
to return to some islands claimed by russia around world war ii. >> hardly anybody lives here, but in japan and russia both claim these islands. the japanese call them the northern territories. flag has been debated. the soviet union control of them and under an agreement signed by japan in 1951. but tokyo wants a for your of the islands back -- wants 4 of the islands back. the country is marking northern territory day. >> we are continuing negotiations with the fundamental goal of completing a peace treaty with russia. >> although, he says he wants a peaceful resolution to the dispute, not all japanese feel the same. >> they invaded and conquered our land during the war and we were not able to fight back. it is a surge. >> the russian prime minister dmitry medvedev has visited the islands. his visit has raised tensions with tokyo in the past. northern territory day has become a fixture in the diaries of right-wingers in japan as they seek to reassert japanese influence. analysts say that abe needs all the help he can get in limiting chinese militarism despite his vows to be tough with beij
, will engage russia to seek further reductions in our nuclear arsenals and continue leading the global effort to secure nuclear materials that could fall into wrong lands. >> so how many nuclear weapons does the president want to reduce? of the 1700 nuclear weapons the u.s. now possesses, the white house believes 1000 to 1100 warheads would provide an equal level of security. >> under one scenario is 1000 war leads to lower thresholds to maintain a capable nuclear deterrent. >>> if we have to blow-up more than one p planet we might need more than 1000 nuclear warheads. >> is this a reciprocal deal with russia. >> we may as well try to get something for it. >> these are strategic warheads you are talking about i don't know. >> yes. >> 1000 of these, are about 50 times the size of north korea. 1000 is fine if the russians come down and the chinese stay down to thissal level because nobody can do a first strike. >> are the russians wanting to go along? >> i think they are. these things are very expense to maintain. russia has real problems. >> where did we see that not long ago? we saw it when f
right? he is the richest man in russia who just bought the worst team in the nba. but as you'll see, he's not like any other owner of a big time american sports franchise. he's an adrenaline junkie with a few unusual toys. >> see? [gun clicking] >> and he owes some of his fame and fortune to a bevy of party girls. >> frankly speaking, i like women. >> coal has made jim rogers and his company rich, and that's why we were surprised to hear what this power baron has to say about what coal does to the environment. you know, there are a lot of people, many of them in your industry, many people that you probably know, who say that global warming is not a big problem. >> it's my judgment it is a problem. we need to go to work on it now. and it's critical that we start to act in this country. >> but if it's so critical, why is rogers still building new coal-burning power plants? >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. politics and business can be strange bedfellows. in this episode, we have a report on a billionaire walking a fine line between the russian government and american prof
things with good returns. >> the kremlin and russia is having a big privatization program, and you, on the other hand, are buying into some of these privatizations. how does that work, sir? >> we have focused on bringing top investors with us. we brought china investment corporation to invest in several transactions. last year 1.5 billion came from investors. so our approach is invest a little bit of money, but have investors since the walls come and invest in russia so it's all about increasing the partnership of foreign investors and of private investors in the foreign economy. >> we had the ipo going on at the moment, as well. you are a stakeholder in that, as well. can you tell us what the intentions are regarding that ipo? >> well, we're big deliverers in my business. we're a shareholder. we would like to increase our stake in the business and we would like to continue bringing investors with us. we already brought quite a few investors into the company. the ipo will be happening tonight. we have big delivery of the business because it's a monopoly stock exchange in russia. pr
nuclear weapons would signal reduced commitment to european security and embolden russia, who would seek to make use of that. if there were any such weakening of resolve, it would create instability, perhaps a crisis of confidence in europe, and potentially lead to more nuclear percolation. i outlined this in his first introductory. just to highlight whether this is true. there are questions in here. secondly, there is a question about whether deterrence are different in any way compare to those over here. and doesn't matter. there is also a question about what is driving this. are there increasing divisions between european and their attitudes towards russia? those are my questions. it is the american information security council, and we engage in discussions like this around nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation. but i'm going to introduce to you first dub brown, more formally lord browne, who is the secretary of defense around 2006 until 2009. he is also part of the european leadership network. we are talking about nuclear deterrence. i'm not. >> thank you very much. thank you for
battles. the memorial remains one of the most symbolic sites in russia. here come close to a million soldiers died in just six months of ruthless combat. a breath-taking german advance into russia had been blocked at stalingrad. hundreds of thousands of men died in a brutal urban warfare as the red army refused to yield. then, once the russian winter set in, fresh soviet forces surrounded the entire army, killing or capturing every man. the german commander was forced into a humiliating situation. this man witnessed the surrender, but the images that etched most strongly on his memory are the images of death and a burning river. >> everything was on fire. the bank of the river was covered mixed with human heads, arms, legs. there are the remains of people who were being taken across when they were bombed. >> the scale of the loss of life is almost beyond imagination and it all happened in just a few months. all of these gravestones have the same date of death. i did the end of 1942 or the beginning of 1943. anniversary, 17,000 new names have been carved on the monument including the
a research center near damascus. russia says the facts are not yet clear but adds that any air strike would be completely unacceptable. >> we are analyzing the information as we receive it. if the allegations are confirmed, then it is our position this is a serious breach of the united nations charter. this would be an unacceptable action against a sovereign government. >> the syrian media say two people were killed when israeli jets bombed the research center near damascus and five more injured. israel has not commented on the allegations, but the israeli government had warned syria this week that it would not accept any syrian weapons falling into the hands of hezbollah. israelis are concerned about the possibility of a chemical weapons attack. people have been stockpiling gas masks for months. >> i would rather actually use it as a warning sign, by which israel is warning both hezbollah and assad that israel is well aware of what is going on. >> israelis fear for their safety. the air strikes marked an escalation in the conflict. now syria says it reserves the right to retaliate. >> in a
sales in russia lead to a worse than expected fourth quarter in russia. >>> natixis shares up near 20%. unveiling a simpler structure on a special dividend. >>> and the final week of campaigni campaigning in italy with polls suggesting bersani has the lead. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >> okay. first thing to say is we have three hours of the good stuff today. >> yes, we do. for all the americans on holiday today, we know you wouldn't want to miss a single second of it the the.we have so much going on. we're going to hear from wayne swan, sir phillip green, we're going to hear tr -- >> you are out of the fashion week, right sfp. >> yeah. i really enjoy getting the perspective from designers because what they say about where they're seeing strength tr around the world and frankly when you ask them and they say we're investing in digital that's as important if not more than what's happening in the retail world. >> did you see some great things? >> there are some pretty things there, as well. what was interesting is
. it's all over a boy living here in the u.s. he came from russia and russia's now demanding that the u.s. return a two-year-old boy adopted by the same texas family as his brother. there were two boys and one of them was found dead at the family home last month under suspicious circumstances. molly line has more from our new york city news room now they want the other little boy back? >> exactly. russian lawmakers and officials are expressing outrage following the january death of the three year old adoptee, demanding the little brother be turned to his homeland. and they were adopted by laura and adam shadow. max died on january 21st, but exactly how remains under investigation pending autopsy results. and the sheriff's office claims they were outside playing when she he discovered max lying unconscious and transferred to a local hospital where he later died. texas child welfare are monitoring this and the younger brother remains with the parents. the reaction in russia are extreme and accusing this mother of murder before tempering the statements. u.s. embassy released a statement, w
, in talking about another country, russia. you know, russia desperately wants to reproduce itself to the rest of the world. and not in some of the main it has been. they get this opportunity with the g20 coming up in september. crystal ball, do you see anything from a coordination standpoint from the g20, and -- having out of this? this? and easy russia's image change? >> i think this is a big opportunity for the prime minister to show what could happen in russia. we will just have to see. because they're sitting on all these oil reserves. we know where the price of oil is. but there as you know there's a lot of problems. and so we have to see whether communist, russia can show that it's taking some of these reforms it needs to take. and we will see. and this is a perfect opportunity to do so. so far i think, as i said, the only g20 meeting that really did any thing positive was the one in london. and i give credit to gordon brown. that was his greatest moment i think at that particular time. do it. no, i mean come effect very organized meetings. i was in korea. there was no one who can organ
people when it exploded over a remote part of russia last week. they were caught by surprise. how did that happen and how can we prevent it from happening here? up next, the new details that makes all of these questions even scarier than you think. and a horrifying discovery for hotel guests in california. oh, this is bad. oh, it's not good. they found out the water being used for bathing and drinking in their hotel rooms was very unwelcome ingredients. we're going to leave it at that for now. bring you the story in a bit. the growing debate over whether president obama is campaigning against himself as he tells local news outlets the best way to avoid budget cuts that the white house designed and he signed into law. >> the man who literally wrote the book about the budget battle put this to rest, whose idea was the sequester and did you ever think that we'd actually get to this point? >> first, it was the white house. it was obama and jack plouffe and rod who went to the tktic leaders harry reid and this is the solution, but everyone has their fingerprints on this. >> we're getting
russia and the u.s. russia demanding the return of a two-year-old boy, he and his brother were adopted by a texas couple, but the boys' older brother, seen here, was found dead at their home last month under suspicious circumstances. molly line has more from new york city. >> russian lawmakers and officials are expressing some outrage following the january death of his three-year-old russian adoptee in texas, demanding the boy's little brother be returned to his homeland. max shadow and his two-year-old brother christopher were adopted last year by a couple of garden dale. max died on january 21, but exactly how remains under investigation pending occupy results. the sheriff's office said the mother claims the boys were outside in the yard playing unattended when she later discovered max lying unconscious. he was transferred to a local hospital where he later died. texas child welfare authorities are involved here. they're monitoring the family and the younger brother remains at home with his adoptive parents. reaction in russia to the death has been extreme with some russian officials
putting their money currently. but to russia with love, currency wars coming to moscow as g-20 leaders meet there. did liesman go? if so, it's a big home coming. "squawk box" begins right now. >>> good morning, everybody. welcome to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with joe kernen. andrew ross sorkin is off today. our guest host this morning is sir martin sorrell. our top story, nightmare at sea. more than 4,000 passengers on the disabled carnival cruise cry oomph docked late last night. michelle caruso cabrera is there on scene. she's going to join us with more and what the means for carnival and the broader cruise industry overall. >>> we are tracking the markets this morning. a lot of excitement fueled in large part by deal activities. in the last few days aloep, we heard berkshire hathway is buying heinz for $3 billion. and comcast announcing a $16.7 deal to buy out ge's remaining stake in cnbc parent nbc universal. warn buffett on "squawk box" yesterday. >> i'm ready for on the another element. please, if you see any walking by, please call me. >> how much do you h
clear that the syrian people would be much better off if china and russia not blocked effective action authorized by the united nations. can my honorable friend say what we're doing to try to help the poor people of syria? >> hear, hear. >> well, first of all, my right old friend, the international development secretary has, like me, visited the syrian border and seen the refugee camps for herself and britain, i believe, with is the second largest donor for health and aid into those camps and is right to say one of the biggest thing to happen is for the chinese and russians consider again their positions and recognize the transition at the top of syria would be good for the whole of that part of the world and i believe good for russia as well. we should continue to work with the opposition groups in syria to put pressure on the regime, not the least through sanctions, but also provide aid and health for those who are fleeing it. >> graham m. morris? >> thank you, speaker, seaham school of technology serves a growing population and some of the most deprived wards in the country and need
in those components on that part. you know, just as an aside, in talking about another country, russia, you know, russia desperately wants to reintroduce its self to the rest of the world. and not in some of the way that it has been. they have this opportunity with a g20 coming of in september. crystal ball. do you see anything from a coordinations standpoint from veggie 20 coming out of this? you see russia's image changing? >> well, i think this is a bigger opportunity for the prime minister to show what could happen. we will just have to see. they're sitting and these are reserves. we know where the price of oil is, but there are a lot of problems. and so we have tessie weather, you know, russia can show that it is taking some of these reforms it needs to take. we will see, and this is a perfect opporunity to do so. so far, i think, as i said, the only g20 meeting that really did anything positive was the one in london, and i give credit to gordon brown, that was his greatest moment, i think, at that particular time. the i mean, you have had very well organized meetings. i was in korea.
. that will involve russia, and nothing will be solved in syria without the assistance in russia. meeting with mr. lavarov will be important as well. then he has to understand that the entire region, qatar and others, they had real security interests involved as far as iran is concerned, and they have security issues that we need to help fulfill. the release of assistance to the u.a. saudi arabia. these are issues affecting syria. they're also affecting iran and israel, and are finally, of course, we have to watch what's taking place in eswript. we don't see democracy unfolding in the way it should, and jobs aren't created, and then the people who have been on the streets are going to be revolting again. here highly educated and unemployed. that's not -- >> not at all. briefly, just p a few seconds we have left. the whole cyber war. the seeber attacks. i know you know china very well. how tough should the president be? is it time to start really putting this front and center? >> we have to put it front and center. not just with china where, with russia wra. this notion that somehow china will be
to monetize the russia angle going forward? >> tnk has been a successful venture for ten years and it's a joint venture that has run its course. russia is so important for the oil and gas industry. we've worked there for many years and made big differences in terms of russian oil and gas production. .i think we've taken what had been a bit of a problem and turned it into an opportunity and i'm very much looking forward to working with ross net. >> how are you going to monitor the opportunity in that respect? >> it has great potential. it's the largest oil producing country in the world. we'll own just under 20% of the shares. we'll have roles on the board, but i see a long cooperation potentially between bp and ross net and opportunities inside and outside of russia. plus i think we can help with many of its assets. i'm excited about it. >> now back to the earnings. around the increase in the dividend this year, is that the message then to shareholders, growing confidence? >> yes. bp has been through a bit of a long wave length transition here from 2010. we sure that our shareholders
eye on the countdown to the 2014 winter olympics than sochi, russia. the town is buzzing with the sound of construction as crews put together the remarkable stadiums and venues for winter sports. costs are already over $50 billion, four times the 2007 estimates. some venues are complete and ready for their trial runs on ice. they have the cold weather to do it right now. >>> and auction in france seemed tailored for car enthusiasts and history buffs alike. cars and bikes filled the famed pierre hall in paris. this plane may seem familiar to film fans. the famed yellow plane from oscar winner "out of africa." cars from the turn of the century and 20th century from the 1990s are featured here. >> finally, this little four-legged friend looking for a new home. little 2-year-old tonik is getting a lot of attention after thinks foster family posted this adoption and online. >> freaky. >> yeah, it is, kind of. many say the dog has a human face. >> it looks photo shopped. >> it does. altered even more. especially look at the eyes. while he was a mixed breed, he comes from poodle
in the middle east or russia or america. which means this may be the last time it is seen in this country. enjoy it while you can. bbc news, london. >> the work of apollo picasso, bringing today's program to close. you can consider -- you can continue watching "bbc world news america" for constant updates. simply check your local listings for our channel #. "bbc world news america for all of news america" thank you for watching and we will see you back here tomorrow. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. union bank. fidelity investments. and sony pictures classics, now presenting "amour." >> your personal economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change, fidelity can help you readjust your retirement plan, rethink how you are invested, and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a wide range of investment choices that can fit your personal economy. fidelity investments, turn here. ♪ - hi, neighbor! you
. >> scientists found the biggest fragment of a meteorite that exploded with the force of an atomic bomb in russia. it weighs almost 2 kilos and one of more than 100 bits found so far. it injured around 1500 people and damaged thousands of homes in siberia earlier this month. proof that good things come in small packages. an indian rocket put seven canadian satellites into orbit. they include two of the world's smallest telescopes. more from toronto. >> when you think of space science, you usually think big. the canadian satellites aboard aloft by this indian rocket are tiny, just 27 centimeters across, weighing less than 7 kilos each. >> we have done this before. >> back on earth, two more of the tube shape devices are getting ready for herb at the university of toronto's institute for aerospace studies. a total of six have been designed here. their task is formidable. but the manager telescopes' pointed deep into space, the satellite, data on cosmic explosions and primordial matter. >> the astronomy's -- astronomers are interested in spending big, massive stars. they tend to lead it brief and vi
for biz this hour. let's check in now on the markets. >>> people in central russia need more time and more money to deal with the damage caused by last week's meteor crash. shattered glass injured hundreds of residents. government officials say repair work will take nearly a month to complete and cost millions of dollars. the meteor exploded on friday before hitting the ground. the resulting shock wave blew out win dose adows and damaged . officials estimate the damage at around $33 million. they say workers are replacing windows at schools, but they know walls aremain severely damaged. the governor has told officials to buy glass and other building materials to buy materials from nearby areas to speed up the work. >> translator: if larger fragments are found, it will be of great interest for people who research asteroids and comets. >> the excitement isn't limited to scientists. residents of a village nearby are rushing to the fields around their homes, hoping to cash in. many villagers say they saw small objects falli ining from sky after the meteor exploded. they say they found meteorit
states. the two the started it, united states and russia, have the largest arsenal. everyone has dozens. the united states and russia have 95% of the weapons. then you get united kingdom, france, china, india, pakistan, each with somewhere between 100 and 200 nuclear-weapons. north korea has a couple of weapons, maybe somewhere between six and 12. every time the test the use up some of their plutonium. the negotiated agreement in the 1990's with the nine states. host: what is the infrastructure that is needed to be a real threat? guest: that is a very quick -- a very good question. north korea cannot deliver this weapon. it is probably too bulky to put on a plane or missile. there is not much they can do with it. baby fat exit. but that is about it. most countries get a clear weapons and that is to stop other countries to stop from attacking them. it is one of the reasons nuclear-weapons have not been used in 60 years, despite the united states being in major wars. no one has used a nuclear weapon and that is because it not have much military value. you are seeing this change, particula
relationship changed and evolved with russia during the obama administration? what are the positives and negatives? guest: i think what has happened with russia, putin, who is the leader of russia, who came from the k.g.b., who came from the old soviet union, in my estimation is going back to his bad old ways. there was great hope for democracy in russia and nominally there are still elections and there's democracy but putin has consolidated power and has made it very difficult for democrats in russia to be able to have democratic government. and that's the big worry. and of course when you look at what russia has done and what china has done in the united nations, they have wielded their veto power and made it difficult for us to slap sanctions on iran, to help prevent iran from having a nuclear weapon. they have not been good players. and so i've seen russian democracy slide backwards. as long as putin is there, and it's really a shame because i think the russian people really want democracy. and i think putin is trying to be like the old communist leaders that we all remember, khr
: with russia, putin came kgb and is going back to his bad old ways. there was hope for democracy in russia. putin has consolidated power and the difficult for democrats in russia to be able to have democratic government. that is the big worry. look at what russia and china have done in the united nations. they have made it difficult to slap sanctions on iran and to prevent iran from having a nuclear weapon. i have seen russian democracy slide backwards as long as putin in there. i think the russian people want democracy. putin is trying to be like the old russian leaders and trying to rule with an iron fist. i think it strangles russian democracy. we see less and less freedoms for the people. they are an important country. host: we have another tweet. host: you have nothing to do with this nomination. what a year thoughts about senator hagel? guest: if you start a precedent that you need 60 votes, i think that is a bad precedent. i've had some questions about senator hagel. majority should prevail. host: how would you vote? guest: i don't like hypothetical. once you start with this nominat
, and that was a long, long time ago. the arsenals of the united states and russia are full of many, many nuclear weapons many, many, many times bigger than this. but this is a rough and ready nuke of the kind that it would not be hard for the iranians or the north koreans or pakistanis or others to design. and so what would happen if one of these things was popped off in downtown manhattan? well, the map shows certain assumptions about wind speed and other factors what the devastation would be, and, of course, it's worst around the ground zero, and it's slowly getting a little bit better as you go farther out. but the estimate in this scientific journal is that this relatively small nuclear device would jury about 1.6 million people and kill over 600 million people just from being -- 600,000 people. i think we need to think about these kinds of dangers because they are not going away, and as the iranian nuclear program accelerates, these are very real possibilities that we have to think very hard about. rome was brought down by barbarians. we have to be very careful that we ourselves are not bro
escaping russia's new ban on adoptions to the united states. it went into effect on january 1st. part of russia's retaliation for a set of human rights sanctions passed by the u.s. last year. americans have adopted over 60,000 russian children since the end of the soviet union. but russian officials have pointed to the cases of 19 children reportedly abused by american parents. ordinary russians reached out to offer support. one woman gave kendra and jason $1,000 to help cover expenses. another dropped off a pair of warm boots for paulina. finally, authorities agreed to allow about 50 children to travel to the u.s., including paulina. yet hundreds more adoptions remain stuck. those families may never see the children again. as she prepared to leave moscow, paulina was excited. practicing her english, and playing with her new gift. >> she's learning that it's forever and we'll be there when she goes to sleep and wakes up. >> reporter: when the plane touched down in houston, paulina skaggs was finally home. >> and good to see that story, but keep in mine that hundreds of cases are still
negotiations would be held at the end of february and involve the u.s., china, russia, britain, france, and germany. he was also open to an offer from the united states for discussions. >> we have to make sure this time, and this is very fair to make sure the other side who comes with authentic intention, with fair and real intention. >> security forces in molly say the top commander has been caught. he was captured by an armed group near the nigerian border. last week france and mullion troops -- malian troups liberated three cities. an egyptian man who appears in a video being beaten by police has security forces -- says security forces made him change his story. he is shown being stripped and bundled into of them in cairo. on sunday he appeared on egyptian television saying protesters attacked him, but now he says it is the police. more from cairo. >> this story has gripped the country for the past two days, and much of it was happening live on television. it was friday when this man who was beaten up and humiliated, drive naked under the eyes of the egyptians or saturday when he ap
and we went on a trip with the first lady, and a small group of journalists out to russia, and got a chance to see interesting sites, and a close-up look at hillary clinton, and one of the things that stood out in my mind, not the temples and all of that, but this moment in kazakhstan, and she was presented with a whip, and normally it's just the men that carries the whips with them, and she was considered so powerful as a first lady and she was presented with one of them, and she got a kick out of that, and there were a lot of jokes that followed that. >> right. we used to call them remember the hillary clinton trips. and they were under the radar, and there was some coverage but not as much, so you could really get to know her. it was a small group. and there was very interesting times. of course i have been following her for the past four years at the state department. >> jill, you actually said something that was pretty interesting earlier today and you wrote a whole article about it, and nobody saw her sleep. you never knew if you saw her get sleep during those trips, and she
around the globe. >> speaking of major events, we're a year out from the olympics in russia. putin has stacked the deputy chief of the russian olympics. this is just happening. it's interesting to see people just as they're starting to focus, getting ready for the winter olympics. it's come up this time next year, we're kind of over the event and -- >> just a reminder, this is the winter olympics, in case you're warning. >> yeah. 2014. >> there you go. >> a lot of pressure on russia to deliver. a couple of other stories? >> shares in australia national bank are up at yearly highs. australia's biggest lender by assets cited lending revenues. the bank has been hampered by british representatives. reports ooh a sale of some 100 branches never materialized. >>> and a major story developing overnight in ireland. the country's move is in disarray as lawmakers dissipated without securing a bank with the ecb. the irish government hoped to announce the liquidation alongside the ecb. these were issued in 2009 to bail out angelo irish. the ecb says talks are still, quote, ongoing. few details are
the statement this week. it comes this week after the g-20 meeting this russia where the group is expected to -- from market determined exchange rat about growing rhetoric about currency wars. ross, it's kind of extraordinary when you're in a situation where they're talking about the need for emphasizing the need for market-based currencies. >> yeah, exactly. currencies were also discussed last night. the officials at the g-20 summit at the end of the week is a more appropriate place to discuss currency moves. >> silvia wadhwa is in brussels and she recently caught up with the french finance minister and began by asking him about just how concerned he is about the strength of the euro. >> in a strong euro to a dead euro. six months to go, the question is is the euro going to survive? the euro is going to survive. if people today buy the euro, it's because the euro gains confidence from the people. but at the same time, it's not a good news if we are not able to answer the aggressive attitudes on the parts of the world. we must fight the currencies. we must enter into currency wars. but at
finance minister of russia earlier on. he was like, well, why now, we thought they were going to make the statement, they were going to make it? n russia as part of the talks. there's a mass confusion within the g-7 about what they were trying to achieve. maybe the markets got it right. actually that everybody is concerned about the competitiveness. at the moment the russians especially is been actually losing out in these currency wars so to speak since july. have been rallying the ruble against the dollar, rallying again the yen heavily, as well. they're as concerned as anyone about the competitive advantage from the devaluation of these currencies, as well, gained by the japanese and others. face it, as jim o'neil points out in one commentary, the americans have been doing this for 30 years. it's rich to turn around and say anyone can't do. it mr. carney, currently of the bank of canada, soon to be bank of england, said we need forceful representation at the g-20 to solve issues. what's interesting is not to lose track of some of the more important agenda issues from the russians,
of associated forces. even if they pose no immediate threat of attack in russia. how did state department treat this project with its human rights compliance? >> thank you. in fact, as i alluded to in my opening remarks and at greater length, and my testimony, it is a real problem where the state department spokesman is going to have to stand up after russia and china has used the drone against a dissident in a country in the state department will have to explain why that was and that it extremely important for our government and the executive branch to lay down is precisely clear rules for the use of drones. >> wouldn't it be the case that china or someone, the we would condemn that out of hand? that we wouldn't say that this one is okay, that one wasn't? >> if they were being attacked -- >> we are judging the impact at one point. >> is somewhere posing imminent threats to russia in the country they were in was unwilling or unable to prevent that threat, i think we would have to acknowledge the right to defend. >> something that john bellinger said. you need to process this. i do not understan
is that it is incurring in certain countries. we were in russia three years ago. i said there was so much fraud going on. there was not enough cooperation going on between the russian authorities and those of us in the industry trying to fight fraud. since then, they are participating. governments understand there are certain hotspo for most internet fraud. the government are now . we put over 60 people in jail in romania who were internet fraudsters. alternately, i think that process will continue. -- ultimately, i think that process wi continue. >> there are many competitors abroad. how much of your focus is moving overseas? >> ebay is global. 60% of the revenue is outside the u.s. paypal is 50% outside of the u.s. 25% is cross-border. they're both very global entities. we are continuing to expand globally. there are 2 billion internet users. that'll be 4 billion in the next few years. look at where th growth will be. 80% will be in emerging markets. people accessing the w for the first time in their lives. it can be done through a phone or a laptop. we see enormous growth opportunity. we are growing
if that happens, we need to do less with less. >> russia will surpass u.s. defense spending in terms of overall percent of gdp in just two years. china is slated to overtake the u.s. in 2035. >> we've seen double digit increase s in chinese defense spending for more than 15 years now, and that really should not only give pause to the united states but it really should be a source of concern for the countries in the region as well. >> reporter: two years ago, then defense secretary robert gates brow beat nato allies to spent two percent of their gdp on defense. when france wanted to send forces into mali to counter al-qaeda in recent weeks, the u.s. had to provide the airlift and refueling because france needed u.s. help. >> these guys have been going gang busters, rolling out prototypes of advanced weapons systems, whether it's new missiles, aircrafts, new drone aircraft. >> others argue that even with the sequester, the u.s. budget will drafe dwarf it's adversari. >> if is h sequestration happeno from spenting 40 cents out of every dollar to 38 cents. >> reporter: u.s. taxpayers spent $7 liv 1
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